The LDS Process of Repentance

The purpose of this Page is to show the true LDS meaning of the word Repentance. I have done this by providing an exhaustive list of quotes from LDS Leaders. The highlighted words are in bold, as I believe they are pertinent to this discussion. Every quote has a link to lds.org except the ones from “The Miracle of Forgiveness”. This book, while it is not considered official; is quoted by most of the official manuals. Also, it is the book I turned to for help while I was LDS.

Why is repentance so important to me? The most treasured “gift” I desired my entire life was the forgiveness of my sins. In anguish over my sins I turned to the book mentioned above written by my prophet Spencer W. Kimball. Here are some of the words I clung to, and the reason I never found my hearts desire:

It depends upon you whether or not you are forgiven, and when. It could be weeks, it could be years, it could be centuries before that happy day when you have the positive assurance that the Lord has forgiven you. That depends on your humility, your sincerity, your works, your attitudes.” (Pages 324-325)

Trying is Not Sufficient. Nor is repentance complete when one merely tries to abandon sin… It is normal for children to try. They fall and get up numerous times before they can be certain of their footing. But adults, who have gone through these learning periods, must determine what they will do, then proceed to do it. To “try” is weak. To “do the best I can” is not strong… Those who feel that they can sin and be forgiven and then return to sin and be forgiven again and again must straighten out their thinking. Each previously forgiven sin is added to the new one and the whole gets to be a heavy load.”

I sincerely tried to follow the LDS Process of Repentance and gain forgiveness of my sins. But I couldn’t. Now, when I turn to the Bible I read that no one could successfully follow this false process of repentance. The Holy Ghost has revealed the truth! Every single sin was forgiven over 2000 years ago when Christ Atoned for our sins–on the Cross. The forgiveness of all your sins is an unconditional and free gift because of what your Savior has already accomplished! Only those who reject this gift through unbelief are still in their sins.

John the Beloved revealed that Christ’s blood has already washed all our sins away:
“And from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness, and the first begotten of the dead, and the prince of the kings of the earth. Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood” (Revelation 1:5)

The Apostle Peter testified that all who believe in Jesus receive forgiveness:
“To him give all the prophets witness, that through his name whosoever believeth in him shall receive remission of sins.” (Acts 10:43)

I am so thankful to my Lord and Savior for obtaining my forgiveness with His perfect works. He alone is worthy! I pray that you reject the following words from false prophets, and then trust what your Lord and Savior truly did for you. The very moment you do, you will receive the forgiveness that can never be obtained through your works!

From the Sunday School Curriculum:

Gospel Principles, Pages 123-127:

What Is Repentance? Repentance is the way provided for us to become free from our sins and receive forgiveness for them. Sins slow our spiritual progression and can even stop it. Repentance makes it possible for us to grow and develop spiritually again. The privilege of repenting is made possible through the atonement of Jesus Christ. In a way we do not fully understand, Jesus paid for our sins…
Principles of Repentance President Spencer W. Kimball declared: “There is no royal road to repentance, no privileged path to forgiveness. Every man must follow the same course whether he be rich or poor, educated or untrained, tall or short, prince or pauper, king or commoner. … There is only one way. It is a long road spiked with thorns and briars and pitfalls and problems” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Spencer W. Kimball [2006], 38; italics in original).”
We Must Recognize Our Sins. To repent, we must admit to ourselves that we have sinned. If we do not admit this, we cannot repent…
We Must Feel Sorrow for Our Sins. In addition to recognizing our sins, we must feel sincere sorrow for what we have done. We must feel that our sins are terrible. We must want to unload and abandon them…
We Must Forsake Our Sins. Our sincere sorrow should lead us to forsake (stop) our sins. If we have stolen something, we will steal no more. If we have lied, we will lie no more. If we have committed adultery, we will stop. The Lord revealed to the Prophet Joseph Smith, “By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins—behold, he will confess them and forsake them” (D&C 58:43).
We Must Confess Our Sins… We must confess all our sins to the Lord. In addition, we must confess serious sins—such as adultery, fornication, homosexual relations, spouse or child abuse, and the sale or use of illegal drugs—which might affect our standing in the Church, to the proper priesthood authority. If we have sinned against another person, we should confess to the person we have injured. Some less serious sins involve no one but ourselves and the Lord. These may be confessed privately to the Lord.
We Must Make Restitution. Part of repentance is to make restitution. This means that as much as possible we must make right any wrong that we have done. For example, a thief should give back what he has stolen. A liar should make the truth known. A gossip who has slandered the character of a person should work to restore the good name of the person he has harmed. As we do these things, God will not mention our sins to us when we are judged (see Ezekiel 33:15–16).
We Must Forgive Others. A vital part of repentance is to forgive those who have sinned against us. The Lord will not forgive us unless our hearts are fully cleansed of all hate, bitterness, and bad feelings against other people (see 3 Nephi 13:14–15). “Wherefore, I say unto you, that ye ought to forgive one another; for he that forgiveth not his brother his trespasses standeth condemned before the Lord; for there remaineth in him the greater sin” (D&C 64:9).…
We Must Keep the Commandments of God. To make our repentance complete we must keep the commandments of the Lord (see D&C 1:32). We are not fully repentant if we do not pay tithes or keep the Sabbath day holy or obey the Word of Wisdom. We are not repentant if we do not sustain the authorities of the Church and do not love the Lord and our fellowmen. If we do not pray and are unkind to others, we are surely not repentant. When we repent, our life changes. President Kimball said: “First, one repents. Having gained that ground he then must live the commandments of the Lord to retain his vantage point. This is necessary to secure complete forgiveness” (Teachings of Presidents of the Church: Spencer W. Kimball, 43)….
How Repentance Helps Us. As we repent, the atonement of Jesus Christ becomes fully effective in our lives, and the Lord forgives our sins. We become free from the bondage of our sins, and we find joy…

The Dangers of Procrastinating Our Repentance. What are some possible consequences of procrastinating our repentance? The prophets have declared that “this life is the time for men to prepare to meet God” (Alma 34:32). We should repent now, every day. When we get up in the morning, we should examine ourselves to see whether the Spirit of God is with us. At night before we go to sleep, we should review our acts and words of the day and ask the Lord to help us recognize the things for which we need to repent. By repenting every day and having the Lord forgive our sins, we will experience the daily process of becoming perfect.”
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/gospel-principles/chapter-19-repentance?lang=eng>

The Presidents of the Church: Teacher’s Manual Lesson 38: Spencer W. Kimball—Model of Forgiveness (Lessons for 12 & 13 year olds, taught in odd years) pages 192-193

President Kimball outlined the steps for repentance and forgiveness very carefully in the Miracle of Forgiveness:
1. We must awake to the fact that we have committed sins. Read 2 Corinthians 7:9–10.
2. We must abandon sin. Read James 4:7.
3. We must confess our sins: (1) to persons we have offended, (2) to the Lord himself, and (3) to the Lord’s authorized representatives if the sins are of a serious nature. (See Doctrine and Covenants 58:43: “By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins—behold, he will confess them and forsake them.”)
4. We must make restitution where we can. (See Miracle of Forgiveness, p. 194: “The repentant sinner is required to make restitution insofar as it is possible.”)
5. We must thenceforth keep the commandments of God. (See Doctrine and Covenants 1:32: “Nevertheless, he that repents and does the commandments of the Lord shall be forgiven.”)
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/the-presidents-of-the-church-teachers-manual/lesson-38-spencerw-kimball-model-of-forgiveness?lang=eng

Preparing for Exaltation: Teacher’s Manual Lesson 12: Repentance Is a Blessing (Lessons for 12 & 13 year olds, taught in even years) pages 62-67

Note to the teacher: Heavenly Father has lovingly included repentance in the gospel plan and promised to receive all who forsake their sins and come to him with a broken heart and contrite spirit. Be sure to leave class members with hope and encouragement following this lesson. Repentance is necessary for everyone. It is a great blessing that allows us to be forgiven and cleansed of our sins so we can achieve exaltation.
Repentance Allows Us to Become Clean Again
On the chalkboard write in large letters SINS.
Have you ever done something wrong and wished you had a giant eraser to undo your action? (This is a general question. Do not ask class members to name the actions they are thinking of.) Using the eraser labeled Repentance, erase the word SINS from the chalkboard. Make sure class members can see the label as you erase. Explain that repentance is the process Heavenly Father has given us for “erasing” our sins. Heavenly Father wants us to return to live with him after this life, but no unclean, or sinful, person can live with him (see Moses 6:57). Heavenly Father knows that everyone will make mistakes and commit sins while on the earth, so he has given us a way to become clean again after we have sinned. This is repentance. Explain that because Jesus Christ paid for all our sins with his suffering, when we repent we can be forgiven and can become clean again (see D&C 19:16)…
Repentance Requires Effort…
1. Recognize your sin and desire to change…
2. Confess your sin.
3. Forsake your sin. Why is it necessary to confess your sin? To whom should you confess? Explain that all sins must be confessed to the Lord. If we have sinned against another person (for example, if you lied to your mother), we should also confess to that person. Serious sins must also be confessed to the bishop or branch president. Confession shows that we are sincere about wanting to repent.
What does it mean to forsake your sin? Explain that to forsake means to give up. If we forsake a sin, we resolve never to do that wrong thing again. Why is forsaking your sin an important part of repentance?
4. Make restitution. Explain that to make restitution means to make right, as much as is possible, what we have done wrong…
5. Keep the commandments. Explain that the last step in repentance is striving to keep all the commandments of God (see D&C 1:32). Repentance is a process that we will have to use throughout our lives, but as we become more perfect in keeping the commandments, we will do less for which we need to repent…
Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ Will Forgive Us When We Repent.
Explain that repentance can be a long and difficult process. But the effort required to repent is more than repaid by the blessings we receive when we do repent…
Have a person read the following statement by Elder Spencer W. Kimball when he was a member of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles: “What relief! What comfort! What joy! Those laden with transgressions and sorrows and sin may be forgiven and cleansed and purified if they will return to their Lord, learn of him, and keep his commandments” (The Miracle of Forgiveness [1969], 368)…
Testify of the joy and gratitude you feel for the principle of repentance, which enables us to be forgiven of our sins. Express your gratitude for Christ’s Atonement, which makes repentance possible…
For the following object lesson, bring to class a clear bottle or bowl of water, a few drops of red food coloring, and a few drops of liquid bleach… Have class members read and mark Isaiah 1:18.
Why do you think the prophet Isaiah used the colors scarlet and crimson in describing sins? (The color red represents blood, which implies serious sin. Isaiah is saying that we can repent even if we have committed serious sins.) In contrast, why did he use the phrase white as snow to show God’s forgiveness? (To represent purity.) Through repentance we can become pure and clean again.)
Show the class the container of water. Explain that the clean, clear water represents a person free from sin. Add a few drops of red food coloring to the water. Have class members observe the coloring as it gradually discolors all the water. Explain that sin discolors our lives like the food coloring discolored the water.
Add a few drops of the liquid bleach to the container and gently stir or swirl until the water is clear again.
What gospel principles does the bleach represent? (Repentance and forgiveness.)
Explain that as the bleach makes the water clear again, sincere repentance enables us to be forgiven and become clean again after we have sinned.
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/preparing-for-exaltation-teachers-manual/lesson-12-repentance-is-a-blessing?lang=eng

Doctrine and Covenants and Church History Gospel Doctrine Teacher’s Manual, Lesson 2: “Behold, I Am Jesus Christ, the Savior of the World” page 8

Through the Atonement, we can be forgiven of our sins and inherit celestial glory.
Read the following passages with class members: D&C 18:11–12; 19:16–17, 20; 58:42; 76:62–70. What do these passages teach about the blessings we can receive through the Savior’s Atonement? (Answers could include those listed below.)
a. We can repent of our sins and come unto Him (D&C 18:11–12).
b. If we repent, Christ has taken upon Himself the suffering for our sins (D&C 19:16–17, 20).
c. If we repent, the Lord forgives us and remembers our sins no more (D&C 58:42).

Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/doctrine-and-covenants-and-church-history-gospel-doctrine-teachers-manual/lesson-2-behold-i-am-jesus-christ-the-savior-of-the-world?lang=eng

Doctrine and Covenants and Church History Gospel Doctrine Teacher’s Manual, Lesson 7: “The First Principles and Ordinances of the Gospel” pages 36-40:

Through sincere repentance, we can partake of the blessings of the Atonement.
Explain that repentance is a major theme in the Doctrine and Covenants. The Lord teaches the doctrine of repentance and repeatedly emphasizes the need to repent. He promises great blessings to those who repent—and punishments for those who do not.
What is repentance? (See D&C 58:42–43. Repentance is the process of becoming cleansed from our sins and receiving forgiveness for them through the power of the Savior’s Atonement. To repent, we must confess and forsake our sins and turn away from evil. We must also turn our heart and will to God, sincerely striving to obey His commandments. To discuss the process of repentance, see the second additional teaching idea.)…
Why is it necessary that we repent to be forgiven of our sins?
Explain that when we sin, we become unclean and subject to the punishments required by the law of justice. Being imperfect, we cannot become clean again or meet the demands of justice on our own. By atoning for our sins, the Savior took upon Himself the punishments required by the law of justice and is able to offer the mercy and forgiveness we need to become clean. These blessings of the Atonement are available to us only on the condition that we repent (Alma 7:14).
Elder Richard G. Scott of the Quorum of the Twelve outlined the essential elements of repentance as follows:
“Sorrow for sin. [This will] bring a sincere desire for change and a willingness to submit to every requirement for forgiveness. …
“Abandonment of sin. This is an unyielding, permanent resolve to not repeat the transgression. …
“Confession of sin. You always need to confess your sins to the Lord. If they are serious transgressions, such as immorality, they need to be confessed to a bishop or stake president. …
“Restitution for sin. You must restore as far as possible all that which is stolen, damaged, or defiled. …
“Obedience to all the commandments. Full obedience brings the complete power of the gospel into your life. … It includes things you might not initially consider part of repentance, such as attending meetings, paying tithing, giving service, and forgiving others. …
“Recognition of the Savior. Of all the necessary steps to repentance, I testify that the most critically important is for you to have a conviction that forgiveness comes because of the Redeemer” (in Conference Report, Apr. 1995, 102; or Ensign, May 1995, 76–77).
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/doctrine-and-covenants-and-church-history-gospel-doctrine-teachers-manual/lesson-7-the-first-principles-and-ordinances-of-the-gospel?lang=eng

Old Testament Gospel Doctrine Teacher’s Manual, Lesson 24: “Create in Me a Clean Heart” page 116

Hope for the repentant. If you emphasize that it is never too late to repent, you may want to share the following statement by Elder Boyd K. Packer:
“The discouraging idea that a mistake (or even a series of them) makes it everlastingly too late, does not come from the Lord. He has said that if we will repent, not only will He forgive us our transgressions, but He will forget them and remember our sins no more. … Repentance is like soap; it can wash sin away. Ground-in dirt may take the strong detergent of discipline to get the stains out, but out they will come”.
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/old-testament-gospel-doctrine-teachers-manual/lesson-24-create-in-me-a-clean-heart?lang=eng

New Testament Gospel Doctrine Teacher’s Manual, Lesson 4: “Prepare Ye the Way of the Lord” page 14

What does it mean to repent?
a. Feeling godly sorrow for sin (2 Corinthians 7:9–10).
b. Confessing and forsaking sins (D&C 58:42–43).
c. Making amends, where possible, for wrongs done (Luke 19:8).
d. Obeying the commandments (D&C 1:31–32).
e. Turning to the Lord and serving him (Mosiah 7:33).
How does repentance help us prepare to dwell with Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ? (See 3 Nephi 27:19.)
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/new-testament-gospel-doctrine-teachers-manual/lesson-4-prepare-ye-the-way-of-the-lord?lang=eng

Book of Mormon Gospel Doctrine Teacher’s Manual, Lesson 16: Ye Shall Be Called the Children of Christ, page 72

“What did King Benjamin teach about how we obtain a remission of our sins?” (Mosiah 4:9–10) 10 And again, believe that ye must repent of your sins and forsake them, and humble yourselves before God; and ask in sincerity of heart that he would forgive you; and now, if you believe all these things see that ye do them.) What did he teach about how we retain a remission of our sins? (See Mosiah 4:11–12, 26) 26 And now, for the sake of these things which I have spoken unto you—that is, for the sake of retaining a remission of your sins from day to day, that ye may walk guiltless before God—I would that ye should impart of your substance to the poor, every man according to that which he hath, such as feeding the hungry, clothing the naked, visiting the sick and administering to their relief, both spiritually and temporally, according to their wants.
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/book-of-mormon-gospel-doctrine-teachers-manual/lesson-16-ye-shall-be-called-the-children-of-christ?lang=eng

Melchizedek Priesthood and Relief Society Curriculum:

Teachings of Presidents of the Church Spencer W. Kimball, Chapter 4: The Miracle of Forgiveness, pages 34-44:

President Spencer W. Kimball taught that “repentance is ever the key to a better, happier life. All of us need it.” He also observed that “hope is … the great incentive to repentance, for without it no one would make the difficult, extended effort required.”…
What relief! What comfort! What joy! Those laden with transgressions and sorrows and sin may be forgiven and cleansed and purified if they will return to their Lord, learn of him, and keep his commandments. And all of us needing to repent of day-to-day follies and weaknesses can likewise share in this miracle.
We all need repentance. “… There cannot any unclean thing enter into the kingdom of God. …” (1 Ne. 15:34.) And again, “… no unclean thing can dwell with God. …” (1 Ne. 10:21.) To the prophets the term unclean in this context means what it means to God. To man the word may be relative in meaning—one minute speck of dirt does not make a white shirt or dress unclean, for example. But to God who is perfection, cleanliness means moral and personal cleanliness. Less than that is, in one degree or another, uncleanliness and hence cannot dwell with God. Were it not for the blessed gifts of repentance and forgiveness this would be a hopeless situation for man, since no one except the Master has ever lived sinless on the earth…
Recognition of sin and feeling godly sorrow are a part of true repentance. Repentance is a kind and merciful law. It is far-reaching and all-inclusive. … It is composed of many elements, each one indispensable to complete repentance. …There is no royal road to repentance, no privileged path to forgiveness…
To every forgiveness there is a condition. The plaster must be as wide as the sore. The fasting, the prayers, the humility must be equal to or greater than the sin. There must be a broken heart and a contrite spirit. There must be “sackcloth and ashes.” There must be tears and genuine change of heart.
Abandonment of sin includes building a new life… There is one crucial test of repentance. This is abandonment of the sin. Providing that a person discontinues his sin with the right motives—because of a growing consciousness of the gravity of the sin and a willingness to comply with the laws of the Lord—he is genuinely repenting. This criterion has been set by the Lord: “By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins—behold, he will confess them and forsake them.” (D&C 58:43. Italics added.) In other words, it is not real repentance until one has abandoned the error of his way and started on a new path. … The saving power does not extend to him who merely wants to change his life. True repentance prods one to action…
Confession lifts burdens. The confession of sin is a necessary element in repentance and therefore in obtaining forgiveness. It is one of the tests of true repentance, for, “By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins—behold, he will confess them and forsake them.” (D&C 58:43. Italics added.)…
Knowing the hearts of men, and their intents, and their abilities to repent and regenerate themselves, the Lord waits to forgive until the repentance has matured. The transgressor must have a “broken heart and a contrite spirit” and be willing to humble himself and do all that is required. The confession of his major sins to a proper Church authority is one of those requirements made by the Lord. These sins include adultery, fornication, other sexual transgressions, and other sins of comparable seriousness. This procedure of confession assures proper controls and protection for the Church and its people and sets the feet of the transgressor on the path of true repentance…
Restitution is a necessary part of repentance… In the process of repentance we must restore completely where possible, otherwise restore to the maximum degree attainable. And through it all we must remember that the pleading sinner, desiring to make restitution for his acts, must also forgive others of all offenses committed against him. The Lord will not forgive us unless our hearts are fully purged of all hate, bitterness and accusation against our fellowmen.
True repentance includes a commitment to live the Lord’s commandments.
In his preface to modern revelation, the Lord outlined what is one of the most difficult requirements in true repentance. For some it is the hardest part of repentance, because it puts one on guard for the remainder of his life. The Lord says: “… I the Lord cannot look upon sin with the least degree of allowance; “Nevertheless, he that repents and does the commandments of the Lord shall be forgiven.” (D&C 1:31–32. Italics added.) This scripture is most precise. First, one repents. Having gained that ground he then must live the commandments of the Lord to retain his vantage point. This is necessary to secure complete forgiveness. … Repentance must involve an all-out, total surrender to the program of the Lord. That transgressor is not fully repentant who neglects his tithing, misses his meetings, breaks the Sabbath, fails in his family prayers, does not sustain the authorities of the Church, breaks the Word of Wisdom, does not love the Lord nor his fellowmen. … God cannot forgive unless the transgressor shows a true repentance which spreads to all areas of his life. …“Doing the commandments” includes the many activities required of the faithful. … General good works and devotion accompanied by constructive attitudes are what is needed. In addition, a sound way to neutralize the effects of sin in one’s life is to bring the light of the gospel to others who do not now enjoy it. This can mean working with both inactive members of the Church and nonmembers—perhaps more usually the latter. Note how the Lord has related the forgiveness of sins to the bearing of testimony respecting the latter-day work: “For I will forgive you of your sins with this commandment—that you remain steadfast in your minds in solemnity and the spirit of prayer, in bearing testimony to all the world of those things which are communicated unto you.” (D&C 84:61. Italics added.)
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-spencer-w-kimball/chapter-4?lang=eng

Teachings of Presidents of the Church Harold B. Lee, Chapter 4: The First Principles and Ordinances of the Gospel, pages 29-30:

Why is daily repentance necessary? In order for good to blossom it must be cultivated and exercised by constant practice, and to be truly righteous there is required a daily pruning of the evil growth of our characters by a daily repentance from sin…. Now what are the steps to be taken on this climb up the road of repentance in order to be worthy of God’s forgiveness, through the redemption of the Master’s atoning sacrifice, and the privileges of eternal life in the world to come? An all-wise Father, foreseeing that some would fall in sin and all would have need to repent, has provided in the teachings of his gospel and through his Church the plan of salvation that defines the clear-cut way to repentance.
First, those in sin must confess them.By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins—behold, he will confess them and forsake them.” (Doc. and Cov. D&C 58:43) That confession must be made first to him or her who has been most wronged by your acts. A sincere confession is not merely admitting guilt after the proof is already in evidence…
Following confession, one in sin must show forth the fruits of his repentance by good deeds that are weighed against the bad. He must make proper restitution to the limit of his power to restore that which he has taken away or to repair the damage he has done. He that repents thus of his sins and altogether turns away therefrom, to return no more to a repetition thereof, is entitled to the promise of a forgiveness of his sins, if he has not committed the unpardonable sin, as it was declared by the Prophet Isaiah, “Though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool.” (Isaiah 1:18.)…The Lord said, “Go [thy way] and sin no more; but unto that soul who sinneth [meaning again] shall the former sins return, saith the Lord your God” (D&C 82:7).
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-harold-b-lee/chapter-4?lang=eng

Teachings of Presidents of the Church Joseph F. Smith, Chapter 5: Faith and Repentance, pages 61:

Only true repentance is acceptable to God. Men can only be saved and exalted in the kingdom of God in righteousness, therefore we must repent of our sins, and walk in the light as Christ is in the light, that his blood may cleanse us from all sins, and that we may have fellowship with God and receive of his glory and exaltation.
Does repentance consist of sorrow for wrong doing? Yes, but is this all? By no means. True repentance only is acceptable to God, nothing short of it will answer the purpose. Then what is true repentance? True repentance is not only sorrow for sins, and humble penitence and contrition before God, but it involves the necessity of turning away from them, a discontinuance of all evil practices and deeds, a thorough reformation of life, a vital change from evil to good, from vice to virtue, from darkness to light. Not only so, but to make restitution, so far as it is possible, for all the wrongs we have done, to pay our debts, and restore to God and man their rights—that which is due to them from us. This is true repentance, and the exercise of the will and all the powers of body and mind is demanded, to complete this glorious work of repentance; then God will accept it.
No mouth profession of repentance is acceptable to God unless it is carried out in practice. We must have works as well as faith; we must do as well as pretend to do.
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-of-presidents-of-the-church-joseph-fielding-smith/chapter-5-faith-and-repentance?lang=eng

Teachings of Presidents of the Church Brigham Young, Chapter 9: Repentance and Baptism, page 64

Has water, in itself, any virtue to wash away sin? Certainly not; but the Lord says, “If the sinner will repent of his sins, and go down into the waters of baptism, and there be buried in the likeness of being put into the earth and buried, and again be delivered from the water, in the likeness of being born—if in the sincerity of his heart he will do this, his sins shall be washed away.” [See D&C 128:12–13.] Will the water of itself wash them away? No; but keeping the commandments of God will cleanse away the stain of sin (DBY, 159).”
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-brigham-young/chapter-9?lang=eng

Teachings of Presidents of the Church Heber J. Grant, Chapter 16: Forgiving Others, pages 147-148

May God help each and every one of us to remember that the gospel of Jesus Christ is not only a gospel of conversion, but it is a gospel of forgiveness. We have it recorded that though a man’s sins be as scarlet, if he will repent, they shall all be as white as snow [see Isaiah 1:18]. I rejoice in that remarkable revelation which says: “I, the Lord, will forgive whom I will forgive, but of you it is required to forgive all men.” [D&C 64:10.]
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-heber-j-grant/chapter-16?lang=eng

Teachings of Presidents of the Church David O. McKay, Chapter 21: The First Principles and Ordinances of the Gospel, page 198-198

What does repentance mean? A change of life, a change of thought, a change of action. If you have been angry and hateful, change that hatred and enmity to love and consideration. If you have cheated a brother, let your conscience smite you and change that, and ask his forgiveness, and never do it again. In thus changing your life from those things which are on the animal plane, you repent of your sins. If you profane Deity, never do it again! Instead of profaning his name, worship him! And once that feeling of change comes to the soul, you desire to be born again, to have a new life. …
It is not uncommon for people to have remorse for mistakes made, for follies and sins committed, but to have no turning away from such frailties and evils. They may even feel penitent; but “penitence,” we are told, “is transient, and may involve no change of character or conduct.” Repentance, on the other hand, “is sorrow for sin with self-condemnation, and complete turning away from the sin.” It is, therefore, more than mere remorse; “it comprehends a change of nature befitting heaven.”
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-david-o-mckay/chapter-21?lang=eng

Teachings of Presidents of the Church Wilford Woodruff, Chapter 7: The Atonement of Jesus Christ, pages 71-72

And what is repentance? The forsaking of sin. The man who repents, if he be a swearer, swears no more; or a thief, steals no more; he turns away from all former sins and commits them no more. It is not repentance to say, I repent today, and then steal tomorrow; that is the repentance of the world, which is displeasing in the sight of God.
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/teachings-david-o-mckay/chapter-21?lang=eng

The Latter-day Saint Woman: Basic Manual for Women, Part A, Lesson 2: Repentance, Pages 16-19

In order to repent, we must follow a certain process. This process is explained in Gospel Principles chapter 19, pages 123–26. Discuss the seven parts of repentance discussed in Gospel Principles chapter 19…
1. Recognizing sin
2. Feeling sorrow for sin
3. Forsaking sin
4. Confessing sin
5. Making restitution
6. Forgiving others
7. Keeping the commandments of God
Because Jesus Christ paid for our sins, He has the power to forgive us. When we follow the process of repentance, the Savior promises that He will forgive us of our sins and remember them no more. Read Doctrine and Covenants 58:42.
Through repentance we become clean and pure again. We are able to look back on our former selves and recall our sins, but without pain. Instead, we feel at peace.
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/the-latter-day-saint-woman-basic-manual-for-women-part-a/gospel-principles-and-doctrine/lesson-2-repentance?lang=eng

Duties and Blessings of the Priesthood: Basic Manual for Priesthood Holders, Part A, Lesson 28: Repentance, pages 208-210

How Does a Person Repent? Sin is like dirt on our bodies. It makes us spiritually unclean. Repentance is like washing off the dirt. After repenting, we feel refreshed and clean. Elder A. Theodore Tuttle explained it this way:
“Repentance is like soap. It is the soap of life. Like soap, it washes away the sins of life. It is to be used as frequently as necessary. One must keep in mind, however, that misuse—lack of thorough cleansing and half-hearted effort—may result in ‘tattletale gray.’ Properly used, however, the soap of life cleanses thoroughly, completely, and permanently. … “One day we … will be ushered before the judgment bar of the Lord. There we shall stand either besmirched, dirty, and unclean, or by acceptance and application of the great and marvelous gift of cleansing—by the soap of life—we may stand clean, forgiven, and pure before the Lord. The next time you use soap, you might also want to think of cleansing your spirit by applying the soap of life, the universal law of repentance” (“Repentance,” Improvement Era, Nov. 1968, 64, 67).
In order to repent, we must follow certain steps.
Discuss the seven parts of repentance as explained in the Gospel Principles manual, chapter 19… (The seven parts are recognizing sin, feeling sorrow for sin, forsaking sin, confessing sin, making restitution, forgiving others, and keeping the commandments of God.) True repentance is not easy. It takes time and effort. For this reason, we cannot put off the day of our repentance (see Alma 13:27).
The Joy of Repentance. We repent to gain forgiveness of our sins. But if Jesus Christ had not paid for our sins and died for us, we could never be forgiven. It is only through His atoning sacrifice that mercy can satisfy justice and we can have our sins cleansed from us (see Alma 34:10–16). This is a great blessing, and we should always be thankful for it. Jesus paid for our sins, but they are not removed from us unless we repent.
Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/duties-and-blessings-of-the-priesthood-basic-manual-for-priesthood-holders-part-a/gospel-principles-and-doctrines/lesson-28-repentance?lang=eng

Aaronic Priesthood Curriculum:

Aaronic Priesthood Manual 1, Lesson 24: Christ-Centered Repentance, pages 82-85

Write the following phrases on wordstrips:
a. Recognize our sins
b. Feel sorrow for our sins
c. Have faith in the atonement of Jesus Christ
d. Confess our sins
e. Abandon our sins
f. Make restitution for our sins
g. Keep His commandments and endure to the end…

Tell the young men that before we can repent, we must recognize that we are sinning. Then we must feel sorry that we have disobeyed God’s commandments. Post the first two wordstrips.
What kinds of things might we do wrong in our day-to-day living? Help the young men to see that major transgressions such as murder, adultery, or theft are not the only sins that require us to repent. We also need to repent of small things we do every day. Such things as dishonest actions, losing our tempers, showing disrespect to our parents, gossiping, or failing to follow through on an assignment all weaken our characters and keep us from enjoying the companionship of the Holy Ghost and becoming like our Heavenly Father…
To whom must we confess our sins?
After the young men have expressed their ideas, point out that we should confess to the person we have wronged. We must also confess to the Lord. In addition, the seriousness of the transgression may require that we go to the bishop. Remind the young men that the bishop is there to help and not to condemn. Bishops always keep such information confidential. What kinds of sins must we confess to our bishop?
Elder Marion G. Romney explained, “Where one’s transgressions are of such a nature as would, unrepented of, put in jeopardy his right to membership or fellowship in the Church of Jesus Christ, full and effective confession would … require confession … to his bishop” (in Conference Report, Oct. 1955, p. 1251, italics added). Such sins include sexual transgressions and any major violation of the law…
Put up the wordstrip, “Abandon our sins.” Ask the young men what it means to abandon our sins. Help the young men understand that a truly repentant person will not repeat his sin.
Put up the wordstrip “Make restitution for our sins.” Explain that the word restitution means to make right the wrong that was done.
Have a young man read Alma 36:24–26. How did Alma make restitution for his sins? (He preached the gospel to try to help people feel the joy he felt.) Remind the quorum that there are some offenses that simply cannot be completely undone…Explain that swearing, gossiping, lying, and bearing false witness fall in this category. But many offenses can be repaired.
Put up the final wordstrip, “Keep His commandments and endure to the end.”
Explain that if we have faith in Jesus Christ, we can overcome our sins and receive the guidance and support of the Lord throughout our lives. Point out that this step is perhaps the hardest. It means that to prove our sincerity we must be on guard every day so that we do not fall back into old habits. To earn God’s forgiveness we should go the extra mile, forsaking not only our sins, but doing good wherever we can…
Explain that if the young men continue to feel guilty after they have repented, they should ask themselves these questions:
1. Have I completed all the steps of repentance?
2. Have I asked Heavenly Father to forgive me?
3. Have I allowed the Lord to take my burden by trusting him?
4. Am I doing all that I can to keep the commandments?

Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/aaronic-priesthood-manual-1/lesson-24-christ-centered-repentance?lang=eng

Young Women Curriculum:

Young Women Manual 1, Lesson 22: Repentance, pages 98-100

Repentance Is Necessary to Obtain Forgiveness
Read the following quotation in which one of our Church leaders compares repentance to an eraser:
“God … has a pencil with an eraser on it and he has promised us that he will use it if we will repent and change our ways. … He has said that if we would forsake our evil and thoroughly make up our minds against it, then he would wash it out of his mind and just forget the whole thing. Of course, he expects that we will wash it out of our minds also” (Sterling W. Sill, Making the Most of Yourself [Salt Lake City: Bookcraft, 1971], p. 93). Why is repentance such a wonderful principle and such a great blessing in our lives?
Begin by posting the wordstrip “Steps to Repentance:
“1. Recognize we have done wrong.
“2. Covenant with the Lord that we will never repeat the sin we have committed and are repenting of. ‘By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins—behold, he will confess them and forsake them.’ (D&C 58:43.)
“3. Recommit ourselves to living a better life in all phases of the gospel.
“4. Make restitution for the wrongs we have committed by—“a. Repenting in prayer to the Lord. b. Confessing to our bishop … [if the sin is a major one]. “c. Apologizing to those we have offended.
“5. The depth of our repentance must be as deep as the sin we have committed. There is no easy way. It hurts, but it also cleanses.
“6. Time is the next element of repentance and restitution. “a. Time to prove to ourselves, to our Lord, to our fellowmen that we have committed ourselves to a new way of life. “b. Time to study the scriptures and dedicate our lives to the commandments we learn we must live to be happy and have joy.
“7. Complete forgiveness of ourselves and forgiveness without any feelings of retribution toward those who have offended us.
“8. Finally, the greatest of all blessings: the forgiveness of the Lord. We no longer look back with depression and hurt, but forward to the future with hope and joy and love for God, self, and all mankind” (in Conference Report, Oct. 1976, p. 34; or Ensign, Nov. 1976, p. 26)…
“We all make mistakes. If our repentance is sincere, we have the right to approach [Heavenly Father] for forgiveness, but remember we are not entitled to any quota of mistakes. It is always better that we don’t make them. And surely we shouldn’t go on stupidly or stubbornly repeating the same old mistakes over and over again…
Help the young women realize that repentance is not only for those who have committed major sins, but is a process of becoming a better person. We should use the principle of repentance every day of our lives…
“When we speak of the continual need of repentance, let it not be understood that we refer to a cycle of sinning and repenting and sinning again. That is not complete repentance. We must see the right and follow it, recognize the wrong and forsake it with a ‘Godly sorrow’ if we would obtain the blessings of complete repentance”.

Link to Lesson:
https://www.lds.org/manual/young-women-manual-1/lesson-22-repentance?lang=eng

True to the Faith, Repentance, Pages 132-135:

The Need for Repentance. The Lord has declared that “no unclean thing can inherit the kingdom of heaven” (Alma 11:37). Your sins make you unclean—unworthy to return and dwell in the presence of your Heavenly Father. They also bring anguish to your soul in this life. Through the Atonement of Jesus Christ, Heavenly Father has provided the only way for you to be forgiven of your sins (see “Forgiveness,” pages 70–72). Jesus Christ suffered the penalty for your sins so you can be forgiven if you sincerely repent. As you repent and rely on His saving grace, you will be cleansed from sin…
The Danger of Procrastinating Repentance. Do not rationalize your sins or put off repentance. Amulek warned: “This life is the time for men to prepare to meet God; yea, behold the day of this life is the day for men to perform their labors. … I beseech of you that ye do not procrastinate the day of your repentance until the end; for after this day of life, which is given us to prepare for eternity, behold, if we do not improve our time while in this life, then cometh the night of darkness wherein there can be no labor performed” (Alma 34:32–33).
Elements of Repentance. Repentance is a painful process, but it leads to forgiveness and lasting peace. Through the prophet Isaiah, the Lord said, “Though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool” (Isaiah 1:18). In this dispensation the Lord has promised, “He who has repented of his sins, the same is forgiven, and I, the Lord, remember them no more” (D&C 58:42). Repentance includes the following elements:
Faith in Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ… Repentance is an act of faith in Jesus Christ—an acknowledgment of the power of His Atonement. Remember that you can be forgiven only on His terms. As you gratefully recognize His Atonement and His power to cleanse you from sin, you are able to “exercise your faith unto repentance” (Alma 34:17).
Sorrow for Sin… When you experience godly sorrow, you have a sincere desire for change and a willingness to submit to every requirement for forgiveness.
Confession… Essential to forgiveness is a willingness to disclose fully to your Heavenly Father all that you have done. Kneel before Him in humble prayer, acknowledging your sins. Confess your shame and guilt, and then plead for help. Serious transgressions, such as violations of the law of chastity, may jeopardize your membership in the Church. Therefore, you need to confess these sins to both the Lord and His representatives in the Church. This is done under the care of your bishop or branch president and possibly your stake or mission president, who serve as watchmen and judges in the Church. While only the Lord can forgive sins, these priesthood leaders play a critical role in the process of repentance…
Abandonment of Sin. Although confession is an essential element of repentance, it is not enough. The Lord has said, “By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins—behold, he will confess them and forsake them” (D&C 58:43)…
Restitution. You must restore as far as possible all that has been damaged by your actions, whether that is someone’s property or someone’s good reputation. Willing restitution shows the Lord that you will do all you can to repent.
Righteous Living. It is not enough to simply try to resist evil or empty your life of sin. You must fill your life with righteousness and engage in activities that bring spiritual power. Immerse yourself in the scriptures. Pray daily for the Lord to give you strength beyond your own. At times, fast for special blessings. Full obedience brings the complete power of the gospel into your life, including increased strength to overcome your weaknesses. This obedience includes actions you might not initially consider part of repentance, such as attending meetings, paying tithing, giving service, and forgiving others. The Lord promised, “He that repents and does the commandments of the Lord shall be forgiven” (D&C 1:32).

Link to True to the Faith:
https://www.lds.org/manual/true-to-the-faith/repentance?lang=eng

LDS.org – Gospel Topics:

Repentance

The Need For Repentance
The Lord has declared that “no unclean thing can inherit the kingdom of heaven” (Alma 11:37). Our sins make us unclean—unworthy to return and dwell in the presence of our Heavenly Father. They also bring anguish to our soul in this life.

Through the Atonement of Jesus Christ, our Father in Heaven has provided the only way for us to be forgiven of our sins (see Forgiveness). Jesus Christ suffered the penalty for our sins so we can be forgiven if we sincerely repent. As we repent and rely on His saving grace, we will be cleansed from sin.

Elements of Repentance
Repentance is sometimes a painful process, but it leads to forgiveness and lasting peace. Through the prophet Isaiah, the Lord said, “Though your sins be as scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they be red like crimson, they shall be as wool” (Isaiah 1:18). In this dispensation the Lord has promised, “He who has repented of his sins, the same is forgiven, and I, the Lord, remember them no more” (D&C 58:42). Repentance includes the following elements:

Faith in Our Heavenly Father and Jesus Christ. The power of sin is great. To become free from it, we must turn to our Heavenly Father, pray in faith, and act as He asks us to. Satan may try to convince us that we are not worthy to pray—that our Father in Heaven is so displeased with us that He will never hear our prayers. This is a lie. Our Father in Heaven is always ready to help if we will come to Him with a repentant heart. He has the power to heal us and to help us triumph over sin. Repentance is an act of faith in Jesus Christ—an acknowledgment of the power of His Atonement. We can be forgiven only on His terms. As we gratefully recognize His Atonement and His power to cleanse us from sin, we are able to “exercise [our] faith unto repentance” (Alma 34:17).

Sorrow for Sin. In order to be forgiven, we must first acknowledge within ourselves that we have sinned. If we are striving to live the gospel, such an acknowledgment will lead to “godly sorrow,” which “worketh repentance to salvation” (2 Corinthians 7:10). Godly sorrow does not come because of the natural consequences of sin or because of a fear of punishment; rather, it comes from the knowledge that we have, through our actions, displeased our Heavenly Father and our Savior. When we experience godly sorrow, we have a sincere desire for change and a willingness to submit to every requirement for forgiveness.

Confession. “He that covereth his sins shall not prosper: but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall have mercy” (Proverbs 28:13). Essential to forgiveness is a willingness to disclose fully to our Heavenly Father all that we have done. We must kneel before Him in humble prayer, acknowledging our sins. We confess our shame and guilt, and then plead for help. Serious transgressions, such as violations of the law of chastity, may jeopardize a person’s membership in the Church. Therefore, such sins need to be confessed to both the Lord and His priesthood representatives in the Church. This is done under the care of a bishop or branch president and possibly a stake or mission president, who serve as watchmen and judges in the Church. While only the Lord can forgive sins, these priesthood leaders play a critical role in the process of repentance. They will keep confessions confidential and help throughout the process of repentance.

Abandonment of Sin. Although confession is an essential element of repentance, it is not enough. The Lord has said, “By this ye may know if a man repenteth of his sins—behold, he will confess them and forsake them” (D&C 58:43). We must maintain an unyielding, permanent resolve that we will never repeat the transgression. When we keep this commitment, we will never experience the pain of that sin again. We must flee immediately from any compromising situation. If a certain situation causes us to sin or may cause us to sin, we must leave. We cannot linger in temptation and expect to overcome sin.

Restitution. We must restore as far as possible all that has been damaged by our actions, whether that is someone’s property or someone’s good reputation. Willing restitution shows the Lord that we will do all we can to repent.

Righteous Living. It is not enough to simply try to resist evil or empty our lives of sin. We must fill our lives with righteousness and engage in activities that bring spiritual power. We must immerse ourselves in the scriptures and pray daily for the Lord to give us strength beyond our own. At times, we should fast for special blessings.

Full obedience brings the complete power of the gospel into our lives, including increased strength to overcome our weaknesses. This obedience includes actions we might not initially consider part of repentance, such as attending meetings, paying tithing, giving service, and forgiving others. The Lord promised, “He that repents and does the commandments of the Lord shall be forgiven” (D&C 1:32).
Link to Gospel Topics:
https://www.lds.org/topics/repentance?lang=eng

General Conference Talks

Elder Richard G. Scott of the Quorum of the Twelve Apostles, “Finding Forgiveness,” April 1995, Found in Ensign, May 1995, page 75

Every incorrect choice we make, every sin we commit is a violation of eternal law….
The Redeemer can settle your individual account with justice and grant forgiveness through the merciful path of repentance. 5 Full repentance is absolutely essential for the Atonement to work its complete miracle in your life. …
Forgiveness comes through repentance. What is repentance? How is it accomplished? What are its consequences? These may seem to be simple questions, but it is clear that many do not know how to repent.
In The Miracle of Forgiveness, Spencer W. Kimball gives a superb guide to forgiveness through repentance. It has helped many find their way back. He identifies five essential elements of repentance.
Sorrow for sin. Study and ponder to determine how serious the Lord defines your transgression to be. That will bring healing sorrow and remorse. It will also bring a sincere desire for change and a willingness to submit to every requirement for forgiveness. Alma taught, “Justice exerciseth all his demands, and also mercy claimeth all which is her own; and thus, none but the truly penitent are saved.”
Abandonment of sin. This is an unyielding, permanent resolve to not repeat the transgression. By keeping this commitment, the bitter aftertaste of that sin need not be experienced again. Remember: “But unto that soul who sinneth shall the former sins return.” Joseph Smith declared: “Repentance is a thing that cannot be trifled with every day. Daily transgression and daily repentance is not … pleasing in the sight of God.
Confession of sin. You always need to confess your sins to the Lord. If they are serious transgressions, such as immorality, they need to be confessed to a bishop or stake president. Please understand that confession is not repentance. It is an essential step, but is not of itself adequate. Partial confession by mentioning lesser mistakes will not help you resolve a more serious, undisclosed transgression. Essential to forgiveness is a willingness to fully disclose to the Lord and, where necessary, His priesthood judge all that you have done. Remember, “He that covereth his sins shall not prosper: but whoso confesseth and forsaketh them shall have mercy.”
Restitution for sin. You must restore as far as possible all that which is stolen, damaged, or defiled. Willing restitution is concrete evidence to the Lord that you are committed to do all you can to repent.
Obedience to all the commandments. Full obedience brings the complete power of the gospel into your life with strength to focus on the abandonment of specific sins. It includes things you might not initially consider part of repentance, such as attending meetings, paying tithing, giving service, and forgiving others. The Lord said: “He that repents and does the commandments of the Lord shall be forgiven.” I would add a sixth step: Recognition of the Savior.

Link to Conference talk:
https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1995/04/finding-forgiveness?lang=eng

The foundational LDS book about forgiveness:

The Miracle of Forgiveness, President Spencer W. Kimball

Page 150: The first step is the turning point at which the sinner consciously recognizes his sin. This is the awakening…
Page163: There is one crucial test of repentance. This is abandonment of the sin…
Pages 164-165: “Trying is Not Sufficient. Nor is repentance complete when one merely tries to abandon sin… It is normal for children to try. They fall and get up numerous times before they can be certain of their footing. But adults, who have gone through these learning periods, must determine what they will do, then proceed to do it. To “try” is weak. To “do the best I can” is not strong
Page 170: Those who feel that they can sin and be forgiven and then return to sin and be forgiven again and again must straighten out their thinking. Each previously forgiven sin is added to the new one and the whole gets to be a heavy load.”…
Page 193: Restitution Always Part of Repentance…
Page 201-202: Keeping God’s Commandments Brings Forgiveness. In His preface to modern revelation, the Lord outlined what is one of the most difficult requirements in true repentance. For some it is the hardest part of repentance, because it puts one on guard for the remainder of his life. The Lord says: …I the Lord cannot look upon sin with the least degree of allowance; Nevertheless, he that repents and does the commandments of the Lord shall be forgiven. (D&C 1:31-32. Italics added.) This scripture is most precise. First, one repents. Having gained that ground he then must live the commandments of the Lord to retain his vantage point. This is necessary to secure complete forgiveness.”

23 Comments

  1. catzgalore said,

    May 23, 2009 at 8:04 am

    This is good! It gives a good overview of LDS doctrine. Nobody has said otherwise.
    What about it, Geoff or Shem (or someone else)? Is this a good summary of LDS teachings on repentance?

  2. geoff456 said,

    May 23, 2009 at 9:11 pm

    Looks pretty good to me! That must have taken a lot of time! One thing you seem to have left out. Grace. We believe in that, too.

    ~Geoff

    PS …of course i think you err with your conclusions.

  3. November 9, 2009 at 6:01 pm

    If you falter because you committed sin, how do you then repent? According to many Christian believers, it is wrong to believe that you have to “confess your sins” and “repent” of them.

    Do you not believe that even after salvation, mankind has to practice moral discipline? That they have to not only forsake their former selves, but strive to live according to the teachings of Jesus Christ? If you become angry, how are you to resolve this?

  4. latterdaysaintwoman said,

    November 10, 2009 at 1:11 pm

    Geoff wrote: “One thing you seem to have left out. Grace. We believe in that, too.”

    The LDS definition of grace is different than the Bible’s definition, so your point is meaningless. Mormons first have to qualify for grace through faith AND the “repentance of their sins.”

    Here is how LDS Prophets define “Grace:

    “Grace. The main idea of the word is divine means of help or strength, given through the bounteous mercy and love of Jesus Christ. It is through the grace of the Lord Jesus, made possible by his atoning sacrifice, that mankind will be raised in immortality, every person receiving his body from the grave in a condition of everlasting life. It is likewise through the grace of the Lord that individuals, through faith in the atonement of Jesus Christ and repentance of their sins, receive strength and assistance to do good works that they otherwise would not be able to maintain if left to their own means. This grace is an enabling power that allows men and women to lay hold on eternal life and exaltation after they have expended their own best efforts.

    Divine grace is needed by every soul in consequence of the fall of Adam and also because of man’s weaknesses and shortcomings. However, grace cannot suffice without total effort on the part of the recipient. Hence the explanation, “It is by grace that we are saved, after all we can do” (2 Ne. 25:23).” (From the LDS Bible Dictionary)
    Link: http://www.lds.org/scriptures/bd/grace?lang=eng&letter=g
    ___________________________________

    Timothy,

    Thank you for your questions. You asked “If you falter because you committed sin, how do you then repent?”

    You must recognize that as a Mormon, you use a different definition for the word “repent” than what the Bible teaches. (To read more about this, please go to my post from January 12th titled “What does Repentance Mean?”) The Greek word for repentance literally means “a change of mind”. Once I understood this, I saw how it differs in Mormonism. Whenever I do something that is against God’s will, I feel regret, and even sorrow. But then I turn in thankfulness to my Savior for paying the price for that sin. I resolve never to do that sin again, but in humility, I realize that I probably will commit that sin again.

    You wrote: “According to many Christian believers, it is wrong to believe that you have to “confess your sins” and “repent” of them.”

    It is important to first realize that every single sin was forgiven at the cross, where Christ paid the penalty for all sins. All who don’t believe this have rejected this priceless gift won for them. All who believe it, receive it (Acts 10:43) and literally, their sins are not imputed against them. The Apostle Paul (quoting Psalm 32) claimed “Saying, Blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered. 8 Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin.” (Romans 4:6-8).

    Secondly, if any Christian told me that it was wrong to believe that you have to “confess your sins” and “repent” of them”; I would ask them “why”. Why do you think this is wrong? They might simply be using different wording and say that you don’t have to do those things in order to gain forgiveness. In that sense, they would be correct.

    We are not forgiven of our sins on a sin by sin basis, as we repent of each sin. If that were true, we would all be sent to spend eternity in hell with Satan and his demons. Every day we commit many sins that we are unaware of. In truth, we were forgiven of every sin over 2,000 years ago at the cross. We don’t repent to gain forgiveness; we repent because we are sorry that we have disobeyed our loving Father in Heaven. In humility we turn to Jesus to thank Him for our forgiveness.

    Third, there are many who claim to be Christian but don’t live a life that proves their faith. Faith without works shows their faith is really dead. Also, there are many Christians who don’t know what the Bible teaches (just as there are many LDS who don’t know what their Church teaches).

    Those who didn’t know the scriptures were also around during Christ’s time. Time and time again, Jesus replied: “Ye do err because you don’t know the scriptures”. Any true Christian who claims it is WRONG to confess and repent of their sins (who understand the true meaning of repentance) are in err because they don’t know the scriptures.

    You asked: “Do you not believe that even after salvation, mankind has to practice moral discipline? That they have to not only forsake their former selves, but strive to live according to the teachings of Jesus Christ?”

    I certainly do believe that true believers should practice moral discipline! Of course I strive to live according to the teachings of Jesus Christ! Did I say anything to the contrary? Claiming that I have already received forgiveness of all my sins does not mean that I live a life of blatant sinfulness! Think about these questions you asked. Your questions show a motivation to obey driven by the need to gain something for yourself (i.e. forgiveness or eternal life). By asking these questions, it shows that you haven’t experienced the motivation that God desires.

    The reason I know this is because I used to think like you do. I used to ask the same questions. It wasn’t until I was brought to faith by the Holy Spirit and had faith that all my sins were forgiven that I understood obedience driven by love. I love my God and my Savior so much that I desire to never sin against them! Jesus told us “If a man love me, he will keep my words”. This is less of a command than it is simply a stated fact. Those who love Jesus will obey Him (There is a great video clip of an ex-Mormon woman who discovered this, found on my blog post from December 6th titled “Are you 100 Percent?”)

    And, for your last question you ask: “If you become angry, how are you to resolve this?”

    There are three aspects to resolving this:
    1) If resolving it means trying to gain forgiveness of that sin, then I cannot resolve it!!! A sin can only be forgiven through the shedding of blood (Hebrews 9:22). When I become angry and sin, that sin has already been resolved! Jesus resolved it over 2,000 years ago at the cross when He shed His lifeblood to pay the penalty for it.

    2) When I become angry and sin, my Lord and Savior has told me to go to whomever I was angry with and humbly ask them for forgiveness. They might not forgive me, but that is not my purpose for going to them. I confess to them and tell them I am sorry out of love for my Savior.

    3) When I commit ANY sin (the ones I recognize), in humility I turn to my God and confess my sin to Him. Immediately, I turn in thankfulness to my Lord for forgiving that sin. I take my focus off of myself and turn it to my Savior in gratitude and love for what He did for me.

    Timothy, I pray that you will turn in gratitude “Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own bloodTo him be glory and dominion for ever and ever. Amen.” (Revelation 1:5-6)

  5. November 11, 2009 at 11:34 am

    So, you would disagree with the Apostle Paul and say that he has a different view of what it means to repent. For instance, in Romans 6, he asks the question “Should we sin so that Grace may abound? God Forbid” and then he talks of the nature of Baptism. That when we are die in baptism, we are dying unto Christ, and we are being buried with Christ. Paul then states that we are raised in newness in the likeness of his Resurrection. He then states that we are to ‘no longer sin’.

    When Christ forgave he asked those whom he had forgive to go and “sin no more”.

    So, the question is this, if you keep committing the same sin over and over again, and you keep “praying” because you know Christ already had forgiven you, is that wrong? According to the Bible, yes it is wrong. Why? Because, as you have stated and responded to, in order to truly repent, one has to have a change of heart. This change of heart recognizes that the sin is sin and that when you rebel against God, you are being held accountable to God for that sin.

    The reality is that when a person sin’s and they repent of that sin, they have to make it a point to no longer return back to that sin.

    It is much like a person who beats his wife and says “honey I am sorry, I will never do that again, I will change” and then the next day beats her. He truly has not repented and has not truly had a change of heart.

    It is much like the addict who says “I will never shoot up again, forgive me,” and the next day he/she goes out and gets high.

    It is much like the alcoholic who promises to never take another sip of alcohol again, and yet is out at the bar drinking up a storm.

    I agree with everything you say and yet, do not understand why you would say that Mormonism teaches a different “kind of repentance”.

    It would be like me saying that you believe in Human Sacrifice and the shedding of innocent blood in order to receive full pardon of your sin. Technically I am right because Christ was human, and he did die on the cross as a sacrifice and that his blood was shed. However, it is how I twist it to mean something totally different and say you believe that.

    This is the same thing that you are doing. You are saying Mormons are wrong to believe that in order to fully repent of one’s sin, you have to turn completely away from it and never to return back to it because sin is the rebellious act against God, it is disobedience and unrighteousness. If you truly repent of that sin, why would you even want to return back to it knowing that it separates you from God?

  6. latterdaysaintwoman said,

    November 11, 2009 at 4:06 pm

    Timothy, you wrote:
    “So, you would disagree with the Apostle Paul and say that he has a different view of what it means to repent. For instance, in Romans 6, he asks the question “Should we sin so that Grace may abound? God Forbid” and then he talks of the nature of Baptism. That when we are die in baptism, we are dying unto Christ, and we are being buried with Christ. Paul then states that we are raised in newness in the likeness of his Resurrection. He then states that we are to ‘no longer sin’.

    In Romans 6, the Apostle Paul is not talking about repentance. In fact, in the entire book of Romans, the words “repent” or “repentance” occurs only two times. In both of these places, Paul is speaking of God’s mercy (Romans 2:4 and 11:29).

    Going back to the passages you quoted in Romans 6, notice that the chapter begins with the question “What shall we say then?” When Paul wrote this epistle to the Romans, it was not divided into chapters and here we see that Paul’s thoughts from chapters 1 through 5 are imperative to understand what his question is referring to. Previously, Paul has concluded that there is no human that can even be “good” by their own works (3:9-20).

    But, just like Abraham, we are credited with righteousness through our faith. Regarding forgiveness, Paul boldly testifies in chapter 4: “Even as David also describeth the blessedness of the man, unto whom God imputeth righteousness without works, saying blessed are they whose iniquities are forgiven, and whose sins are covered. Blessed is the man to whom the Lord will not impute sin.”

    Being told that all of your sins have been forgiven and that none of your sins will be counted against you causes some people to ask “But then what is to stop a person from just going out and blatantly sinning?”

    Paul finishes chapter five with a strange thought, by proclaiming that God gave us His laws so that we would sin even more: “Moreover the law entered, that the offence might abound. But where sin abounded, grace did much more abound.” Here, Paul squelches any reactionary message from someone who might say “Hey if God’s grace is going to be given in greater measure whenever we sin, then maybe we can just continue to sin”. He does this with his question beginning in Chapter 6 “Should we sin so that Grace may abound?”.

    His response is also my response “God forbid. How shall we, that are dead to sin, live any longer therein?”

    As a believer, I am dead to sin, meaning (as shown in verse 7) that my entire life of sin was crucified with Christ on the cross. My sins have all been covered by Christ’s blood! Because of that, I am no longer under God’s law (verse 14). All of this (as explained in chapters 4 and 5) is because like Abraham, I have been credited with Christ’s righteousness through faith in Him. All of my sins have been taken away, and in their place; I am credited with righteousness.

    You wrote:
    “So, the question is this, if you keep committing the same sin over and over again, and you keep “praying” because you know Christ already had forgiven you, is that wrong? According to the Bible, yes it is wrong.”

    You give these three examples of a person who keeps committing the same sin over and over:
    *”It is much like a person who beats his wife and says “honey I am sorry, I will never do that again, I will change” and then the next day beats her.
    *It is much like the addict who says “I will never shoot up again, forgive me,” and the next day he/she goes out and gets high.
    *It is much like the alcoholic who promises to never take another sip of alcohol again, and yet is out at the bar drinking up a storm.”

    In addressing the concept that the same sins should not be repeated over and over, it seems so logical when we pick sins that we personally don’t struggle with. But what about abandoning sins that we DO struggle with all of the time? The reality of abandoning sins we re-commit daily changes the way we look at our ability to do this. And, in recognizing these types of sins it is important to understand how God views these types of sins. Here are a few examples:

    •The writer of James tells us that no one can abandon this sin: “But the tongue can no man tame; it is an unruly evil, full of deadly poison.” (3:8). He also commands us to “swear not” lest we fall into condemnation (5:12). Jesus told us that on Judgment Day we must give account for every idle word we speak (Matthew 12:36).

    •James also tells us how serious contention and “envy” are: “For where envying and strife is, there is confusion and every evil work” (3:16)

    •Again, James testified that not doing the good things that you know you should be doing is sinning. “Therefore to him that knoweth to do good, and doeth it not, to him it is sin.” (4:17). How often every day does that happen?

    •How often are you “fearful”, “unbelieving” of God’s words or tell “lies”? The Apostle John tells us that these sins will cause someone to spend eternity in Hell with Satan (Revelation 21:8).

    •Have you been able to completely abandon the sin of lusting after any woman you are not married to? Jesus claimed that doing so is the very same sin as adultery (Matthew 5:27-28).

    •How often do you worry? Jesus commanded us in His Sermon on the Mount to not be anxious about anything (Matthew 6:24-34).

    •How often do you get angry? Have you completely abandoned the sin of anger? Jesus claimed that those who get angry are in danger of the judgment (Matthew 5:21-22).

    •What about your sins of omission? Jesus told us to pray always (Luke 18:1). He claimed that those who didn’t feed the hungry, clothe the stranger, visit the sick and those in prison were sent to the same place as the devil and his angels (Matthew 25:41-44)

    •How about loving God more than anything or anybody else, including your family? Jesus commanded “Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbour as thyself” (Luke 10:27-28). Do you show by your actions, every single moment of every single day that you do love God in this way? If not, then that means you repeat this sin, over and over again, every day of your life.

    Timothy, this is not an exhaustive list. My point for doing this is to show you the fallacy of being able to abandon our sins. There is a difference between abandoning the types of sins that you mentioned and other sins. When we compare the sins you list with some of the other sins that all humans commit daily; I hope you can understand better what I mean.

    You wrote:
    “I agree with everything you say and yet, do not understand why you would say that Mormonism teaches a different “kind of repentance”.

    The difference can best be seen by asking this question: “When does one receive forgiveness for the sin being repented of?”

    According to Mormon Apostles and Prophets, not until “after” a person meets the many requirements (which include completely abandoning the sin).

    According to Biblical Apostles and Prophets, a person receives forgiveness for all their sins the moment they believe in Jesus (Acts 10:43). If you are interested in reading more passages attesting to this truth from God’s holy Prophets and Apostles, here is a link: http://www.thecityofzion.com/gemshop/PlanOfSalvation/Forgiveness/Guilt.htm

    I am not the best writer, so if you still don’t understand, maybe one of the other Christians can explain it to you better. I apologize for my inabilities, but I pray that the Holy Spirit can still work through my use of His Words. I am praying for you, that your eyes will be opened to understanding. The moment you believe it, you will receive the forgiveness of all your sins. There is no gift more precious and it was bought and paid for with the blood of your Savior, Jesus Christ!

  7. November 13, 2009 at 2:18 am

    Moral Accountablity and Volition of Will.

    Have you any familiarity with this?

    Moral Accountability and Volition of Will is very common place in any religious system. It requires complete purity in its simplistic form. Ancient cultures practiced what is known as purification rites. Some purifications rites are as simple as mere meditation. The goal is to conform one’s natural thoughts to that of a spiritual thoughts. It is the act of taming oneself and one’s desire. It is to avoid anything that will prove damaging to one’s spiritual being and prevent that person from reaching a point where body, mind, and soul is in complete harmony.

    Much like ancient purification rites, Christianity has its own.

    1) Christ taught that in order to be saved, one had to believe on who he is.

    2) Christ commanded the disciples to “preach the gospel, baptizing them in the name of the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, teaching them to obey all that Christ had commanded”. What did Christ command?

    3) When the people were pricked in their hearts, what did they ask Peter? “What must we do to be saved?”

    Peter responded “REPENT” as the first initial step. Peter then went on to say “Be Baptized for the REMISSION OF SINS”. He then stated, “Receive the Gift of the Holy Ghost”.

    Now, let us look at Peter and let us look at Judas.

    Peter denied Christ three times. Yet, Christ committed to Peter the charge to see after the other disciples and those who will come into faith. He was forgiven.

    Judas betrayed Christ, and was not forgiven.

    The reality is this:

    The process of Repentence is a daily objective. Yes, we all have thoughts that are contrary, we all have anger issues, we all lust. This is because of our humanity and volition of will.

    However, there is a wonderful thing about human will. IT CAN BE CONTROLLED. Not in the sinless perfected sense of Christ, however, Christ did command us to Love God with all our heart, might, mind and strength. He also said that we are to love our neighbor as ourselves. Why? Because upon these two GREAT COMMANDMENTS, hang all the prophets and the Law.

    Now, if you truly understand the Bible – what is the one thing that Christ fulfilled? He fulfilled the Atoning Sacrifice for Sin, and broke the bonds of death. Paul said that by one man came sin and death. By another, came eternal life.

    Think of it this way.

    If you go to your employer and say “I am not going to work, I am not going to learn the functions of the job, learn from my mistakes, and increase in my position and take on new challenges and responsibilities, but go ahead and pay me anyway” Is your employer going to pay you for work you do not do?

    Really study out First Century Christianity and Judaism. You will find that by what you are saying, you are Condemning Christ as a heretic, as a false teacher, as a legalist.

    Why? Because did not Christ say in the parable of the sheep and the goats who were the goats and who were the sheep? The sheep are the ones who proved their faith in following him. The goats did not.

    Why did the Rich man find it hard to obey Christ? Why did Christ say “Go and sin no more” to people he forgave? Do you think he just said that to be polite? Or, did the gospel writers misunderstand Christ and really Christ said, “Don’t worry, if you sin, I still forgive you because you are only human?”

    The problem is not with me and my interpretation. The problem is with you and your cheap Grace doctrine.

    If you don’t believe me, maybe you should read a book written by a Christian Martyr called The Cost of Discipleship who talks about the difference between Cheap Grace and Costly Grace. Did you know that the New Testament says “From faith to faith, and from Grace to Grace” that a believer is increased?

    Did not Christ say “by their fruits ye shall know them”

    Yes, I agree with you that Romans is Paul’s systematic theological development. I am well aware of it. However, you missed the entire point of my question.

    WHY WOULD PAUL ASK “Should we sin that grace may abound more?” He is talking about how Christians ought to live their lives – dead to sin. What does Dead to sin mean? If you check the Greek, you will understand that Paul meant that we are to “ABANDON SIN”. And yet, here you are saying that to believe that we are to abandon sin, it is wrong and against scripture, so is Paul Lying?

    Barnes New Testament Notes {Barnes, Albert – 1798 to 1890}:

    Introduction

    THE argument commenced in this chapter is continued through the two following. The general design is the same—to show that the scheme of justification which God had adopted does not lead men to sin, but, on the contrary, to holiness. This is introduced by answering an objection, Ro 6:1. The apostle pursues this subject by various arguments and illustrations, all tending to show that the design and bearing of the scheme of justification was to produce the hatred of sin, and the love and practice of holiness. In this chapter, the argument is mainly drawn from the following sources:

    (1.) From the baptism of Christians, by which they have professed to be dead to sin, and to be bound to live to God, Ro 6:2-13.

    (2.) From the fact that they were now the servants of God, and under obligation, by the laws of servitude, to obey him, Ro 6:15-20.

    (3.) From their former experience of the evil of sin, from its tendency to produce misery and death, and from the fact that by the gospel they had been made ashamed of those things, and had now given themselves to the pure service of God. By these various considerations, he repels the charge that the tendency of the doctrine was to produce licentiousness, but affirms that it was a system of purity and peace. The argument is continued in the two following chapters, showing still further the purifying tendency of the gospel.

    Verse 1. What shall we say then? This is a mode of presenting an objection. The objection refers to what the apostle had said in Ro 5:20. What shall we say to such a sentiment as that where sin abounded grace did much more abound?

    Shall we continue in sin? etc. If sin has been the occasion of grace and favour, ought we not to continue in it, and commit as much as possible, in order that grace might abound? This objection the apostle proceeds to answer, he shows that the consequence does not follow; and proves that the doctrine of justification does not lead to it.

    Apparantly Albert Barnes is a heretic according to your argument here, yet he substantiates the understanding of Romans 6 and to what degree Paul was talking about.

    Listen very carefully to the Christian Martyr – Deidrich Bohnhoeffer and tell me if you agree with him:

    “Cheap grace is the deadly enemy of our Church. We are fighting to-day for costly grace.

    Cheap grace means grace sold on the market like cheapjack’s wares. The sacraments, the forgiveness of sin, and the consolations of religion are thrown away at cut prices. Grace is represented as teh Church’s inexhaustible treasury, from which she showers blessings with generous hands, without asking questions or fixing limits. Grace without price; grace without Cost! The essence of grace, we suppose, is that the account has been paid in advance; and, because it has been paid, everything can be had for nothing. Since the cost was infinite, the possibilities of using and spending it are infinite. What would grace be if it were not cheap?

    Cheap grace means grace as a doctrine, a principle, a system. It means forgiveness of sins proclaimed as a general truth, the love of god taught as teh Christian ‘conception’ of God. An intellectual assent to that idea is held to be of itself sufficient to secure remission of sins. The church which holds the correct doctrine of grace has, it is supposed, ipso facto a part in that grace. In such a Church the world finds a cheap covering for its sins; no contrition is required, still less any real desire to be delivered from sin. Cheap grace therefore amounts to a denial of the living Word of God.

    Cheap grace means the justification of sin without the justification of the sinner. Grace alone does everything, they say, and so everything can remain as it was before. ‘All for sin could not atone.’ The world goes on in the same old way, and we are still sinners ‘even in the best life’ as Luther said. Well, then, let the Christian live like the rest of the world, let him model himself on teh world’s standards in every sphere of life, and not presumptiously aspire to live a different life under grace from his old life under sin.”

    How does one follow Christ? The term Christian is Christianos in Greek, it is simply a term used three times in the New Testament. Christianos means Follower of Christ. So, how does one follow Christ? Merely believing on him and confessing him as their Lord and savior? According to you and your philosophical meanderings, yes, that is all it takes to be a “follower of Christ” by Confessing Christ as Lord.

    Do you know that we are to be a living testimony to the reality and power of Christ’s atonement in our lives by LIVING THE GOSPEL of Jesus Christ, rather than Confessing Christ and being done with it?

    To follow Christ means to take up our Cross daily. To Follow Christ means to pray and seek after the will of the Father.

    LDSW, are you not aware that when you pray, you are PERFORMING A WORK OF RIGHTEOUSNESS that you yourself are condemning? Why are we to pray? Why are we to seek after the kingdom of God? Why are we to live our lives devoted to a Loving Heavenly Father? If we falter in sin, are we not held responsible and accountable for that if we do not repent of that sin?

    You agree that if we continue in sin, then we are rebelling against God, and we are serving Sin rather than Christ. If we serve Christ, we can’t serve Sin. This does not mean that if we fall, we are condmened. Because we do seek after the forgiveness of our loving heavenly father.

    Does a parent not forgive their child when that child comes to them in humility and sincerity, repenting of what they did, acknowledging that what they did is wrong, and that parent saying to that child “you are forever condemned because you are trying to earn my love and compassion”?

    No, a parent will forgive that Child, will take the time to educate that child, to help that child learn and move past that transgression so that Child will be able to recognize temptation, so that child will be able to stand against that temptation if it were to happen again.

    This is why we have the power and gift of the Holy Spirit. Because it is by and through the power of the holy spirit that when we do fall, we can come to our Heavenly Father in complete humility, find strength in his compassion and forgiveness.

    Yet, you say this is a damnable doctrine because it is a doctrine that is based on human works that can’t save us.

    How wrong are you, and how deceitful are you in teaching such falsehoods.

    For, if you truly know and understand scripture, you will know and truly understand that this is the very simple thing that Christ taught, and you my friend are calling Christ a Liar.

    I strongly believe and testify of Christ, and I strongly believe that one day we will be held accountable for every word, and every deed we have done in this life.

    Why? Because I do not believe, nore do I accept Theological double talk, nor do I believe a God that speaks out of both sides of his mouth.

  8. November 13, 2009 at 5:48 pm

    A simple question that needs an important answer:

    If Christ died for our sins we had committed in the past and would possibly commit in the future, then what is the purpose in confessing our sins and seeking to repent of our sins? Would this be null and void because Christ has already covered our sins, therefore we are not obligated to hold ourselves accountable for the things we do? To say we still have to repent of our sins would logically conclude that even though Christ did die for us, there still remains a truth that we will still be held accountable for how we live our lives as we claim to follow Christ right? How do you reconcile this?

    Not one single Christian is able to answer this question – even from the New Testament? Why is that? Because the New Testament does say that we will stand in judgment and be judged according to (as you have stated) every thought, word and deed that we have accomplished in this life.

    Also. do you truly fully understand exactly what it was that Christ fulfilled of the Levitical Law? Did he fulfill the commandments, or the Day of Atonement Sacrifice? And, did Christ come to save us from our sins, or did he come to save us from both Sin and Death? Scripture is clear that he saved us from Sin and Death. That he broke the bonds of Sin and Death. You can’t ignore this.

    Much like we can’t provide the necessary retribution for our sins, we also are not able to possess the power and authority to raise ourselves from the grave.

  9. latterdaysaintwoman said,

    November 16, 2009 at 3:29 pm

    Timothy,

    You asked: “If Christ died for our sins we had committed in the past and would possibly commit in the future, then what is the purpose in confessing our sins and seeking to repent of our sins?

    Your question has a very simple answer and I’m fairly surprised that “not one single Christian is able to answer this question”.

    The answer is love! It’s because of God’s love and mercy already given to you, that gives you the desire to do what He asks of you. When you fail at following God’s commands, you remember the goodness already shown to you and in humility, turn back to Him in thankful repentance. It is God’s goodness which leads you to repentance. This answer is definitely found in the Bible and it comes directly from the New Testament! In fact, the answer can be found in Romans, in the first passage where Paul brings up the topic of repentance:

    Or despisest thou the riches of his goodness and forbearance and longsuffering; not knowing that the goodness of God leadeth thee to repentance?” (Romans 2:4).

    It is God’s goodness, first bestowed on us, that gives us the motivation and desire to repent. Everything we do, all our motivation to repent or obey God, in fact all our good works; come as a result of God’s goodness. This goodness was first shown to us through His love, mercy and forgiveness!!

    When someone loves you and you love them back, you want to please that person. If you do something contrary to what that person desires, you naturally wish to make amends—to make right your wrong. A simple example would be your actions with your spouse or even a good friend. When you do something to hurt the person that loves you and whom you love in return; you desire to mend your relationship. Out of love for that person, you desire to change your actions and ask for forgiveness.

    The motivation that you are following to repent, is the motivation to gain something for yourself: to not be held accountable for your sins and to receive forgiveness for yourself!

    We love him, because he first loved us.” (1 John 4:19)
    Notice here that we love God because He first loved us!

    And be ye kind one to another, tenderhearted, forgiving one another, even as God for Christ’s sake hath forgiven you.” (Ephesians 4:32)

    Forbearing one another, and forgiving one another, if any man have a quarrel against any: even as Christ forgave you, so also do ye.” (Colossians 3:13)

    Notice in these two passages that we are commanded to forgive others because of the forgiveness that we already have!

  10. November 16, 2009 at 6:06 pm

    You state the following:

    1) Mormonism teaches the doctrine of Repentance that is not in the Bible.

    Your reasoning for this is because Mormonism teaches that we have to abandon our sin and live a life devoted to Christ and to our Heavenly Father with obedience. Therefore, because of this, you claim that Mormonism teaches a work-based doctrine that is foreign to the Bible.

    2) You state that repentance is achieved by the Christian believer when they truly come to the cross and ask Christ to come into their life. This then brings about their justification and are saved by the Grace of God. Anything beyond this is called works and the True believer is not under the Law but under Grace. Therefore, all their sins (past, present, and future) are forgiven no matter what.

    Both of these positions are wrong. How are they wrong?

    Because it takes the Gospel of Christ and perverts it into a false gospel. It takes away man’s moral agency and accountability by saying “Christ saved you that is that and nothing you can do, now go and live your life”.

    This is cheap grace. I highly suggest you get a hold of Detriech Bohnoeffer’s Book the Cost of Discipleship and read it. You will be surprised as to how wrong contemporary Christianity is in teaching their doctrine of Grace.

    However, let us get back to the biblical teaching. Repentance is a work – that is required by all true believers.

    Christ commanded those whom he forgave to go and “Sin no more”. Therefore, according to you, Christ is a false teacher because He HIMSELF STATED THAT WE ARE TO NO LONGER WALK IN SIN. How do you reconcile your doctrine with What Christ stated?

    Also, again, you refuse to engage in conversation on exactly what Christ fulfilled concerning the Law of Moses. Did he fulfill every aspect of the Law, or did he fulfill the Sacrifice necessary to perform under the law? These are two separate things.

    Next, what are we truly saved from? The scriptures declare that we are saved from both Sin and death. Paul attested that by one man came sin and death, and by another came salvation and eternal life.

    Third, it is stated that at judgment, even hell will give up the dead to be judged according to their works “And the sea gave up the dead which were in it; and death and hell delivered up the dead which were in them: and they were judged every man according to their works.” See Revelations 20:13.

    Hell here in the Greek is Hades, and all commentaries remark that this is referring to a “Resurrection” that is universal and those that are judged by their works and found unrighteous will experience the Second Death.

    If we are judged by our works, why then are you so against the doctrine when the Holy Scripture that you yourself claim is the authority of God and the Word of God says otherwise? Is God a liar? Is Revelation 20:13 wrong in this?

    You mentioned 1 John, Ephesians, and Colossians. However, are realizing that all that you are saying is regarding “works”. It takes work to cultivate and love. Does a husband love his wife without showing that love through his actions? Does a mother cultivate and show her love for her children without doing this through her actions? According to you and your consistent philosophical meanderings, yes, logically you are saying that we love because God loves through us. This is dangerous doctrine. And the reality of truth is that We love God by showing him we are obedient to his will and commandments.

    Again, I will ask you this simple question. If you sin as a Christian, is it your moral obligation that you are to repent of your sin? Or, is your sin already forgiven of you and you no longer have need to repent of any sins, thereby it does not matter how you live your life, you are already forgiven by God and have eternal security in Heaven, even if you do not live your life in righteousness?

    The scriptures truly speak against you, yet you are so hardened to heed what they say because you would like to pick and choose your scriptures and put your interpretations on them without considering the significance of what you are saying.

    Paul said that we are not to sin anymore. In fact, Romans 12 says that we are to be transformed by the renewing of our mind. How do we transform and renew our mind and no longer be conformed to this world? We cultivate and work out our salvation with fear and trembling. This requires obedience to God.

    Prayer is a work,
    Going to church is a work
    Giving is a work
    Preaching is a work
    Testifying is a work.
    You can’t do anything to avoid working out your salvation – unless you are a hyper Calvinist.

    The truth is = we are to seek forgiveness of our sins, we are to grow from faith to faith, from grace to grace, we are to rely on the will of God and seek to conform to his will by being obedient to his commandments. This is what Christ taught, a doctrine that you considered heretical and not based on scripture.

    Are you willing to call Christ a Liar?

  11. latterdaysaintwoman said,

    November 19, 2009 at 1:22 am

    Timothy,

    I am not sure who you are replying to with many of your comments, but much of it is not to things I wrote. I am guessing that maybe you wrote it for some other blog and you decided to cut and paste it here?

    You wrote:
    Mormonism teaches the doctrine of Repentance that is not in the Bible. Your reasoning for this is because Mormonism teaches that we have to abandon our sin and live a life devoted to Christ and to our Heavenly Father with obedience. Therefore, because of this, you claim that Mormonism teaches a work-based doctrine that is foreign to the Bible.

    The reason Mormonism’s Process of Repentance is not found in the Bible is because it’s a false teaching. God has always taught His people that the shedding of blood is what brings forgiveness:

    “and without shedding of blood is no remission.” (Hebrews 9:22)

    The LDS process of repentance is just a list of various commandments. No one will gain forgiveness by doing the very things that God already expects you to do. As well, LDS leaders claim that a person must completely abandon a sin before they gain forgiveness for that sin. The Bible declares that all sins were forgiven when Christ paid for them at the cross. A person receives forgiveness the moment the Holy Spirit brings them to faith in Jesus.

    As I’ve stated all true believers live in a continual state of repentance: they feel sorrow for their sins and willingly confess their sins. They do this because they know of God’s goodness. And, as I have stated many times, my life is devoted to Jesus and to my Heavenly Father! Every breath I take is in gratitude for what Jesus did for me by gaining my forgiveness. The desire of my life is to be obedient to every command. I pray daily to my God, as the Psalmist did: “Make me to go in the path of thy commandments; for therein do I delight.” Unfortunately I still sin all the time, but when I do I turn in thankfulness to my Savior.

    I, like the Apostle Paul, bemoan:

    For that which I do I allow not: for what I would, that do I not; but what I hate, that do I. If then I do that which I would not, I consent unto the law that it is good. Now then it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me. For I know that in me (that is, in my flesh,) dwelleth no good thing: for to will is present with me; but how to perform that which is good I find not. For the good that I would I do not: but the evil which I would not, that I do. Now if I do that I would not, it is no more I that do it, but sin that dwelleth in me. I find then a law, that, when I would do good, evil is present with me. For I delight in the law of God after the inward man: But I see another law in my members, warring against the law of my mind, and bringing me into captivity to the law of sin which is in my members. O wretched man that I am! who shall deliver me from the body of this death? I thank God through Jesus Christ our Lord.” (Romans 7:15-25)

    You wrote:
    You state that repentance is achieved by the Christian believer when they truly come to the cross and ask Christ to come into their life. This then brings about their justification and are saved by the Grace of God. Anything beyond this is called works and the True believer is not under the Law but under Grace.

    What??? Where have I stated these things? I would never claim that repentance is achieved by the believer when they ask Christ to come into their lives.

    You wrote:
    Christ commanded those whom he forgave to go and “Sin no more”.

    Jesus said this one time to one woman who was caught in the very act of adultery. There are two important things to understand about this event. First, there is no indication given as to whether this woman was a true believer or if she was even sorry for what she had done. However, notice that Jesus told her he did not condemn her.

    Secondly, anyone who commits any sin is advised by God’s Word to “go and sin no more”. This is what every person who loves Jesus desires—to be obedient. Unfortunately, it is not reality. But, any believer who continues in sin, without regard or remorse for what they are doing, is in peril of loosing their faith. We see the example of those who loose their faith because of this in the Parable of the Sower of the Seed: “And these are they which are sown among thorns; such as hear the word, 19 And the cares of this world, and the deceitfulness of riches, and the lusts of other things entering in, choke the word, and it becometh unfruitful.” (Mk 4:18-19)

    You wrote:
    Also, again, you refuse to engage in conversation on exactly what Christ fulfilled concerning the Law of Moses. Did he fulfill every aspect of the Law, or did he fulfill the Sacrifice necessary to perform under the law? These are two separate things. Next, what are we truly saved from? The scriptures declare that we are saved from both Sin and death. Paul attested that by one man came sin and death, and by another came salvation and eternal life.”

    I can’t engage in conversation regarding something that I don’t understand. Exactly what are you trying to say here? Please explain what you mean. I am not familiar with any of this.

    You wrote:
    According to you and your consistent philosophical meanderings, yes, logically you are saying that we love because God loves through us. This is dangerous doctrine. And the reality of truth is that We love God by showing him we are obedient to his will and commandments. Again, I will ask you this simple question. If you sin as a Christian, is it your moral obligation that you are to repent of your sin? Or, is your sin already forgiven of you and you no longer have need to repent of any sins, thereby it does not matter how you live your life, you are already forgiven by God and have eternal security in Heaven, even if you do not live your life in righteousness?

    Once again, I think you must be cutting and pasting from something you wrote to someone else. I have consistently claimed that it does matter how I live my life, and that I DO live my life in righteousness. All true believers will live a life of righteousness, not because they have to in order to gain forgiveness, but because they are already forgiven!! As I have stated multiple times, when you love God and your Savior, you will live a life devoted to them!!!

    You wrote:
    The truth is = we are to seek forgiveness of our sins, we are to grow from faith to faith, from grace to grace, we are to rely on the will of God and seek to conform to his will by being obedient to his commandments.

    Your motivation is to “seek forgiveness of your sins” This is wrong because it shows that you don’t trust (have faith) that Jesus has already done this for you!! Christ has already taken away our sins and Heavenly Father has already declared our forgiveness through Jesus!!! When the Holy Spirit brings us to faith in this truth, God grows our faith and gives us even more grace. The more we rely on God for everything (including our righteousness) the more He transforms us:

    Looking unto Jesus the author and finisher of our faith; who for the joy that was set before him endured the cross, despising the shame, and is set down at the right hand of the throne of God.” (Heb 12:2)

    Now can you see why Jesus is the love of my life?

  12. jbgtn said,

    December 1, 2009 at 2:08 pm

    The “summary” from Catzgalore was very interesting, though rather long for a summary. I read it and thought it sounded good. It sounded like something I need to work on. I missed the point of what was wrong with the doctrine presented. This my first visit to this site. One general comment for everyone is the importance of remaining civil. The old disagreeing without being disagreeable. This seems like a blog where no one is ever going go be convinced of anything, but some good spirited, healthy discussion can be good. I find it interesting to read different ideas.

  13. catzgalore said,

    December 1, 2009 at 9:56 pm

    Jbgtn, the main post isn’t from me, I merely commented on it.
    Catz

  14. muthink said,

    June 20, 2010 at 11:33 am

    Ah, I have the opposite experience as you. I was a Christian for 40 years, but it never “worked” for me. I never felt anything, no benefit. Everything just got worse. I even spent time in a monastery studying to become a monk. One day, having lost practically all hope and trying every church I could I finally stumbled into the Mormon church. I finally found the feeling and the relationship with Christ promised in the bible. I found forgiveness and true transformation. My life totally improved and I help people daily. I realized that this is the true church of Christ and all others were 2nd in his heart. The priesthood, the temples, everything made sense. It also made sense that these peculiar people will never be fully accepted by others and that many will leave to take on other paths, because simply they can’t handle it.
    You are like many ex-members, finding excuses to leave due to weakness, instead of trying and trying to follow the LDS prophets. If you would only continue, you might find success. Sometimes it takes many more years.
    But I bless you. I am sure the journey you are taking is the right one for you. Just believe me, it is not so for everyone. What you are doing is not enough for me. Just keep your mind open. I am sure you will.
    Thank you.

  15. latterdaysaintwoman said,

    June 21, 2010 at 1:08 am

    muthink, you wrote: “It also made sense that these peculiar people will never be fully accepted by others and that many will leave to take on other paths, because simply they can’t handle it. You are like many ex-members, finding excuses to leave due to weakness, instead of trying and trying to follow the LDS prophets. If you would only continue, you might find success. Sometimes it takes many more years.”

    I fully admit that I am weak, very weak. I am so very grateful to God that I am weak, because He chooses those who are weak!

    For ye see your calling, brethren, how that not many wise men after the flesh, not many mighty, not many noble, are called: 27 But God hath chosen the foolish things of the world to confound the wise; and God hath chosen the weak things of the world to confound the things which are mighty; 28 And base things of the world, and things which are despised, hath God chosen, yea, and things which are not, to bring to nought things that are:

    The passage goes on to tell us the reason why–so that no one will glorify themself in God’s presence, but instead, anyone who glories, must do so in Christ:

    29 “That no flesh should glory in his presence. 30 But of him are ye in Christ Jesus, who of God is made unto us wisdom, and righteousness, and sanctification, and redemption: 31 That, according as it is written, He that glorieth, let him glory in the Lord.” (1 Corinthians 1:26-31)

    I am weak, and I am thankful that because of my weakness I was brought to my knees and humbled. I am so grateful to my Savior, who, according to the above passages, is my wisdom, my righteousness, my sanctification, and my redemption! Because Jesus is all these things for me, in my place as my substitute, I fully glory in the Lord. I love and serve Him with every breath, because His life’s blood gained the forgiveness of all my sins.

    You wrote “What you are doing is not enough for me.”

    How can you claim that what I am doing “is not enough for you“? You don’t know me or how I live my life, so how can you state that what I am doing is not enough?

  16. muthink said,

    June 21, 2010 at 4:43 am

    Why you left LDS, is why I joined it. I hear your argument and its a good one and I know its one 90% of the Christian groups use. Its really true, that we need to surrender to Christ completely and not just 90% and then think, I am going to do the other 10% and work really hard and do my best. I understand the folly of that argument that many good people make. And it is truly sinful pride that makes people do this, when its done in the wrong way.

    And as long as we stop the sinful actions, then that’s the proof that the surrender worked, right? I just have found also a component of the atonement that we need to exercise the strength we receive from God as well. It isn’t just about using the atonement alone. There is another part of ourselves that we must learn about. Surrender is not just inaction, but action as well.

    In fact the complete surrender argument alone just rings wrong in me. It always bothered me. Not from pride, but it was the way the Christians were using it, and also then those Christians that used it, I noticed they were all a bit crooked and weak. I then realized they took it too far. They were abusing Christ’s sacrifice.

    It’s more about obedience to the Spirit over the flesh. Its about the humility that goes with that obedience. That’s what I read in the bible.

    Mathew 7.21 is one of the most important clues about what is going on here. In fact, that’s the key to salvation and why this argument of surrender only is only going to take you so far…

    “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven.”

    It doesn’t say those who only call upon him don’t enter, but only those who do His will are guarenteed to enter.

  17. latterdaysaintwoman said,

    June 21, 2010 at 10:12 am

    muthink, you wrote: “Mathew 7.21 is one of the most important clues about what is going on here. In fact, that’s the key to salvation and why this argument of surrender only is only going to take you so far… “Not everyone who says to me, ‘Lord, Lord,’ will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only the one who does the will of my Father in heaven.” It doesn’t say those who only call upon him don’t enter, but only those who do His will are guarenteed to enter.

    I’m not sure what Bible translation you are using, but here is the verse in the KJV:

    Not every one that saith unto me, Lord, Lord, shall enter into the kingdom of heaven; but he that doeth the will of my Father which is in heaven.

    Since Jesus is the one who said these words, then we need to let Jesus interpret exactly what “the will of the Father” is. We find His answer recorded in John:

    And this is the will of him that sent me, that every one which seeth the Son, and believeth on him, may have everlasting life: and I will raise him up at the last day.” (6:40)

    Going back to the Matthew 7 passage and reading it in context, Jesus tells us of three groups of people: 1) those who give mere lip service to God 2) those who do the will of God, and 3) those who sincerely believed that they were doing many wonderful works but thought that those works would gain them eternal life:

    22 “Many will say to me in that day, Lord, Lord, have we not prophesied in thy name? and in thy name have cast out devils? and in thy name done many wonderful works? 23 And then will I profess unto them, I never knew you: depart from me, ye that work iniquity.” (Mt 7:21-23)

    On Judgment Day, the only ones who will be allowed into the Kingdom of Heaven will be those who have faith in Jesus’ works–not their own.

  18. April 3, 2012 at 1:40 am

    Seems to me like one big long justification to not repent.

  19. latterdaysaintwoman said,

    April 4, 2012 at 2:43 am

    GhostVoterA,

    Oh I repent, hundreds of times a day. Every time I sin I go to Heavenly Father and tell Him how sorry I am that I have disobeyed Him again. Then I turn in thankfulness to my Savior who has already paid the price for that sin. That is what repentance is. Just because I trust that Jesus has forgiven all of my sins does not mean that I don’t love and serve God and try to keep His commandments. Every breath I breath is for my Lord whose blood has washed all my sins away:

    And from Jesus Christ, who is the faithful witness, and the first begotten of the dead, and the prince of the kings of the earth. Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood” (Revelation 1:5)

    The “LDS Process of Repentance” is not repentance. It’s really just some of God’s commands that LDS prophets put together and called “repentance“. They claim that keeping these commands will somehow wash away your sins. But doing something that God has already required of you will not remove your sins!

    The writer of Hebrews testifies that the only thing that forgives sins is the shedding of blood: “And almost all things are by the law purged with blood; and without shedding of blood is no remission.” (Hebrews 9:22)

    Christ’s life was the perfect and final sacrifice for the sins of the world! Jesus took away the sins of the world. “The next day John seeth Jesus coming unto him, and saith, Behold the Lamb of God, which taketh away the sin of the world.” (John 1:29)

    The Apostle Peter testified that it is through belief in Jesus that we receive the forgiveness that Christ won for us on the cross:

    To him give all the prophets witness, that through his name whosoever believeth in him shall receive remission of sins.” (Acts 10:43)

    That’s why Jesus testified “That whosoever believeth in him should not perish, but have eternal life.” (John 3:15)

    Do you believe Jesus? The Apostle Peter? John the Baptist? Or the Apostle John?

    Because it is only through unbelief — rejecting Christ’s gift of forgiveness; that you remain in your sins.

  20. lochwade said,

    January 17, 2013 at 10:15 pm

    Hi Timothy,

    I found this website because I caused an unfortunate controversy in a Mormon Sunday School.The issue was repentance. I am not a Mormon- I went to church on invitation, and was invited to the SS.

    Members said that if we sin again after repentance, there is no more repentance or forgiveness for sin. Other members said we must repent in order to receive forgiveness, and if we sin again, we never repented.

    I said the issues were not legal, but relational. I said Jesus cleansed me of all sin once and for ever with his own blood and perfect life. People got angry, and the SS teacher even walked out of the sanctuary.

    I was naive. I didn’t know the Mormon doctrine of salvation was so different than Christian doctrine.

    You wrote,
    “If you go to your employer and say “I am not going to work, I am not going to learn the functions of the job, learn from my mistakes, and increase in my position and take on new challenges and responsibilities, but go ahead and pay me anyway” Is your employer going to pay you for work you do not do?”

    Let me tell a parable based on your example.
    Once there was an Employer who desired the perfect employee- someone who was not anxious for reward, or terrified of being fired. He devised a plan, and asked his Human Resources people to find him the most qualified applicants.

    He interviewed each applicant in turn. When the person was shown into his office, the first thing the Employer did was show the applicant a briefcase filled with cash.

    “You’ll find your entire salary for a year in the briefcase,” he said. “100,000 dollars. It’s yours a free gift, up front, no strings attached. You can take it away and never come back if that’s what you want to do.”

    The employer went on. “Examine your contract. You will note in bold type that it promises you can never be fired from this job. You are highly qualified, but you will find that you are incompetent in what I want you to do. Don’t worry, you can’t be fired. If you accept the job, you will be employed until death, if you so desire.”

    “Well,” the employer asked each applicant in turn,”Do you want the job?”

    The First Applicant looked at the Employer and said, “You’re nuts! No-one can run a business this way!” and he walked out, refusing the money and the contract.

    The Second Applicant looked around. “This is for real?” he asked. When assured that it was, he took the money, signed the contract, and walked out, never to be seen again.

    The Third applicant took the job. But he felt so guilty for having all the money upfront that he was scared there was a catch. He discovered the job was harder than he thought. He wasn’t qualified. In desperation, he tried to hide his incompetence from his Employer. He worked night and day, always afraid he would be fired, and feeling guilty about being paid in advance. His health suffered. His marriage suffered. His relationships with his children suffered. Finally, he quit, saying, “This is the worst job I’ve ever had!”

    The Fourth Applicant said, “Lemme get this straight. I get the money up-front, and I can’t ever get fired?” When assured this was the case, the man had no motivation to do anything. He went to work and put his feet on the desk. He played with his electric pencil sharpener. He wandered the halls, chatting with attractive co-workers. At first, when his employer showed up, he was jumpy and tried to look busy, but he was never reprimanded or called out on his laziness and lack of productive effort.

    Soon he skipped days, and spent his time at the track, betting on the ponies. Every once in a while he would check in, to see if he still had a job, and the Employer always welcomed him with enthusiasm.

    The man finally went to the Employer and said, “I quit! What’s the point of this silly job anyway?”

    The Fifth Applicant was incredibly grateful for the job. He thought to himself, “The character of the man who has hired me must be exceptional. He must be a very compassionate and wise person!”

    On his first day on the job, he quickly realized the task was beyond his capabilities. Knowing his Boss was a compassionate and wise man, the first thing he did was go to him for help. “Here, let me show you a trick I’ve learned,” said his Employer, and so in that manner, the man began to learn the job.

    He made many numerous and costly mistakes during his career. Often these mistakes would bring him to tears, and he would weep in the office of his Employer, genuinely sorry for such errors. But the Employer never fired him, or was angry with him.He simply worked to show the man how to do his job better. He always had his salary in advance. Soon, he grew to love his Employer. They not only had a working relationship, but one that stretched into home and family. The Employer and his employee were best friends. The Employee said, “I would now work for my best friend for nothing! I’m never think about what I will gain, and I never worry about being fired ”

    The Employer had found the perfect employee.

    The perfect Employer is God. He pays us for work we do not do. He pays us for work we CANNOT do. He does this because God’s wish is to be in relationship with us, a deep, real friendship, a deep sharing of experience.

    All “law” is relational. We get trapped in a legal framework. If I steal from you, our relationship will suffer. You can put every Commandment to the same test. They are relational, not legal. God is not man, that He should sin. God is above human concepts of fairness. He lives in a relational reality. It is hard for us to grasp that He can forgive us without our involvement. But think about it? Can’t you forgive someone without them asking you to? If you can do this, why can’t God?

    I will stop now, but try to think in terms of love and relationship, not in terms of law and payment for services rendered.

    All the best in Chirst, Loch

  21. lochwade said,

    January 17, 2013 at 10:40 pm

    Dear Muthink,

    You write:
    “And as long as we stop the sinful actions, then that’s the proof that the surrender worked, right?”

    Dearest Muthink, you must see things from God’s perspective. That perspective is relational. There is no “proof” of salvation, just as Jesus would provide no proof that He was Divine. When asked for a proof, He said, “An evil and adulterous generation seeketh after a sign, but no sign shall be given it save the sign of the prophet Jonas, who was three days and three nights in the belly of the Whale.”

    We are saved by grace, through faith. If you believe Jesus cleansed you from all sin by His blood, you are saved, and that faith is your ONLY sign that you are saved. By that faith, you enter into a relationship with God and Christ. You become animated by the spirit of that relationship, and by the compassionate character of God.

    Here is an example. How do you know you are married? Is it because you can look at your marriage certificate? If your marriage is characterized by anger, violence, distrust, resentment, and animosity, what good is a certificate from the State saying you share a last name with someone else?

    If you are busy cheating on your spouse, can you claim to be married?

    The marriage is an invisible bond of relationship. On the other end of things, you can be the most dutiful and perfect spouse, and never know anything at all about your partner, or even want to. It can be an arrangement of convenience. One person pays the bills, the other raises the kids, but there is no meeting between the two. Are you married?

    The truth of the marriage lies in the relationship.

    There have been very morally upright pagans, and morally upright persons of every faith other than Christianity. A person can be morally impeccable and never claim to be a follower of Christ. Moral behavior is not necessarily a sign of communion with God.

    We all want an outward sign that we are saved. We want proof. But there is none. Do you talk to God? Do you want to be closer to Him? When you do things that you know separate you from God, do you wish you were closer, not farther away?

    Even this is not proof. We know God loves us because Jesus died for our sins. That is knowledge by faith. Some people look to their good works for proof. What happens when they do wrong? The proof vanishes. Some people look to miracles, or to keeping a day, or to circumcision, or to speaking in tongues… there are a thousand “proofs” of salvation, and they are all false. There is no proof, only faith.

  22. ER Rae said,

    December 28, 2013 at 3:58 pm

    Hello, I am not an intellectual person, but I do like to read. The first thing I do not understand is why you are calling yourself the name of a women in the LDS Church when you have left it 🙂 I see your explanation, but surely you could have come up with something to differentiate yourself from Latter Day Saints? Then I was wondering how you thought “faith without works is dead” is no longer applicable. I also could not understand how you thought eternal life is the same as Salvation. We ALL will have eternal life. Do you really expect someone who has not tried to atone for their sins to have the same blessings as someone who has? I really do not understand how you have missed talks and messages on lessons which talk of love and repentance and atonement. Please read the following talk dated 2011: https://www.lds.org/general-conference/2011/10/the-divine-gift-of-repentance?lang=eng

  23. latterdaysaintwoman said,

    March 28, 2014 at 3:33 pm

    Hi ER Rae, Sorry so long to write, haven’t been feeling very good. Before I answer your questions, I need to understand what you are asking.

    You wrote:
    “I also could not understand how you thought eternal life is the same as Salvation. We ALL will have eternal life.”

    Are you LDS? If so, do you go to Church much? What you have stated is not true to LDS nor Christian doctrine, so please help me to understand what you needed.


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